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the wood frog in a sentence

1. In the wood frog (Rana sylvatica), the interior of the globular egg cluster has been found to be up to 6 °C (11 °F) warmer than its surroundings, which is an advantage in its cool northern habitat.

2. Some frogs such as the wood frog or spring peeper can even survive being frozen.

3. In certain species, such as the Northern red-legged frog (Rana aurora) and the wood frog (Rana sylvatica), symbiotic unicellular green algae are present in the gelatinous material.

4. The interior of globular egg clusters of the wood frog (Rana sylvatica) has been found to be up to 6 °C (11 °F) warmer than the surrounding water and this speeds up the development of the larvae.

5. Frogs from temperate climates hibernate during the winter, and four species are known to be able to withstand freezing during this time, including the wood frog (Rana sylvatica).

6. The wood frog (Rana sylvatica), whose habitat extends into the Arctic Circle, buries itself in the ground during winter.

7. The larvae of Haemonchus contortus, a nematode, can survive 44 weeks frozen at -196 °C. For the wood frog (Rana sylvatica), in the winter, as much as 45% of its body may freeze and turn to ice.

8. A single amphibious species, the wood frog, also lives among the lakes of the park.

9. During periods of cold, some ectotherms enter a state of torpor, in which their metabolism slows or, in some cases, such as the wood frog, effectively stops.

10. The true frogs vary greatly in size, ranging from small—such as the wood frog (Lithobates sylvatica)—to large.

11. Other indicator species, at least in New England, are the wood frog, the spadefoot toad, and some species of mole salamanders.

12. The wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus or Rana sylvatica) has a broad distribution over North America, extending from the boreal forest of the north to the southern Appalachians, with several notable disjunct populations including lowland eastern North Carolina.

13. The wood frog has been proposed to be the official state amphibian of New York.

14. No other species has a similar appearance to the wood frog in North America.

15. The feeding pattern of the wood frog, basically similar to that of other ranids, is triggered by prey movement and consists of a bodily lunge that terminates with the mouth opening and an extension of the tongue onto the prey.

16. At this point in the feeding strike, the wood frog differs markedly from more aquatic Lithobates species, such as the green frog, leopard frog, and bullfrog.

17. The wood frog makes contact with the prey with just the tip of its tongue, much like a toad.

18. Although the wood frog is not endangered or threatened, in many parts of its range urbanization is fragmenting populations.

19. The wood frog has a complex lifecycle that depends on multiple habitats, damp lowlands, and adjacent woodlands.

20. The wood frog is a light brown frog with dark patches over its eyes and extending down its back.

21. The Wood Frog is notorious for its verbal spring calling to attract other frogs, which is short and harsh.

22. The Wood Frog however, breeds in wetlands and can breed up to 3,000 eggs at a time.

23. Reptile and amphibian predators of western honey bees include the black girdled lizard, anoles, and other lizards, and various anuran amphibians including the American toad, the American bullfrog and the wood frog.

24. Studies have shown that typically parasitism by Lucilia silvarum has been fatal to their anuran host, but a recent study has found that there are two species of frog, the wood frog and boreal toad, that have actually been able to survive the parasitic larvae.

25. The Wood frog (Rana sylvatica) has a broad distribution over North America, extending from the southern Appalachians to the boreal forest with several notable disjunct populations including lowland eastern North Carolina.

26. The wood frog (Rana sylvatica) has a broad distribution over North America, extending from the southern Appalachians to the boreal forest with several notable disjunct populations including lowland eastern North Carolina.

27. True frogs vary greatly in size, ranging from small—such as the wood frog (Rana sylvatica)—to the largest frog in the world, the Goliath frog (Conraua goliath).

28. The wood frog is an amphibian that has a broad distribution over North America.

29. The wood frog is the only amphibian able to survive in the ecosystem.

30. One of the coolest animals (literally) on the planet, the wood frog has the ability to go into complete hibernation (including complete heart stoppage) during the winter season.