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No. sentence
1 It calls for the abolition of the state which it holds to be undesirable, unnecessary and harmful.
2 Anarchism is only one of the streams of socialist thought, that stream whose main components are concern for liberty and haste to abolish the State.
3 While opposition to the state is central to anarchist thought, defining anarchism is not an easy task as there is a lot of discussion among scholars and anarchists on the matter and various currents perceive anarchism slightly differently.
4 Hence, it might be true to say that anarchism is a cluster of political philosophies opposing authority and hierarchical organisation (including capitalism, nationalism, the state and all associated institutions) in the conduct of all human relations in favour of a society based on decentralisation, freedom and voluntary association.
5 Nonetheless, major elements of the definition of anarchism include the will for a non-coercive society, the rejection of the state apparatus, the belief that human nature allows humans to exist in or progress toward such a non-coercive society and a suggestion on how to act to pursue the ideal of anarchy.
6 In China, philosophical anarchism (i.e. the discussion on the legitimacy of the state) was delineated by Taoist philosophers Zhuang Zhou and Laozi.
7 Aeschylus and Sophocles used the myth of Antigone to illustrate the conflict between rules set by the state and personal autonomy.
8 In the Sasanian Empire, Mazdak called for an egalitarian society and the abolition of monarchy, only to be soon executed by Emperor Kavad I. In Basra, religious sects preached against the state.
9 The first anarchist currents developed throughout the 18th century as William Godwin espoused philosophical anarchism in England, morally delegitimising the state, Max Stirner's thinking paved the way to individualism and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon's theory of mutualism found fertile soil in France.
10 During this time, anarchism took root in other movements critical towards both capitalism and the state such as the anti-nuclear, environmental and peace movements, the counterculture of the 1960s and the New Left.
11 Beyond the specific factions of anarchist movements which constitute political anarchism lies philosophical anarchism which holds that the state lacks moral legitimacy, without necessarily accepting the imperative of revolution to eliminate it. A component especially of individualist anarchism, philosophical anarchism may tolerate the existence of a minimal state, but it argues that citizens have no moral obligation to obey government when it conflicts with individual autonomy.
12 Collectivist anarchism arose alongside Marxism, but it rejected the dictatorship of the proletariat despite the stated Marxist goal of a collectivist stateless society.
13 Anarcho-syndicalism is a branch of anarchism that views labour syndicates as a potential force for revolutionary social change, replacing capitalism and the state with a new society democratically self-managed by workers.
14 This attitude was quite prominent a century ago when seeing the state as a tyrant and some anarchists believing that they had every right to oppose its oppression by any means possible.
15 They saw it as a part of the movement which sought to overthrow the state and capitalism.
16 The school closed after constant harassment by the state and Ferrer was later arrested.
17 Objection to the state and its institutions is a sine qua non of anarchism.
18 Anarchists consider the state as a tool of domination and believe it to be illegitimate regardless of its political tendencies.
19 Anarchists consider the idea that the state is the collective will of the people to be an unachievable fiction due to the fact that the ruling class is distinct from the rest of society.
20 Secondly, anarchism is evaluated as unfeasible or utopian since the state can not be defeated practically.
21 Edmundson claims that while the individual does not owe the state a duty of obedience, this does not imply that anarchism is the inevitable conclusion and the state is still morally legitimate.
22 Alabama is nicknamed the Yellowhammer State, after the state bird.
23 The state tree is the longleaf pine, and the state flower is the camellia.
24 Despite the growth of major industries and urban centers, white rural interests dominated the state legislature from 1901 to the 1960s.
25 Following World War II, Alabama grew as the state's economy changed from one primarily based on agriculture to one with diversified interests.
26 The state's economy in the 21st century is based on management, automotive, finance, manufacturing, aerospace, mineral extraction, healthcare, education, retail, and technology.
27 The state has numerous place names of Native American origin.
28 The agrarian Mississippian culture covered most of the state from 1000 to 1600 CE, with one of its major centers built at what is now the Moundville Archaeological Site in Moundville, Alabama.
29 The expedition of Hernando de Soto passed through Mabila and other parts of the state in 1540.
30 Thomas Bassett, a loyalist to the British monarchy during the Revolutionary era, was one of the earliest white settlers in the state outside Mobile.