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the Niobids in a sentence

1. According to some versions of the myth, among the Niobids, Chloris and her brother Amyclas were not killed because they prayed to Leto.

2. Zeus had turned all the people of Thebes to stone and so no one buried the Niobids until the ninth day after their death, when the gods themselves entombed them.

3. When Chloris married and had children, Apollo granted her son Nestor the years he had taken away from the Niobids.

4. Apollo and Artemis used poisoned arrows to kill them, though according to some versions two of the Niobids were spared, one boy and one girl.

5. Apollo and Artemis used poisoned arrows to kill them, though according to some versions a number of the Niobids were spared.

6. Zeus had turned all the people of Thebes to stone so no one buried the Niobids until the ninth day after their death when the gods themselves entombed them.

7. Niobe boasted of her fourteen children, seven male and seven female (the Niobids), to Leto who only had two children, the twins Apollo and Artemis.

8. The subject of Niobe and the destruction of the Niobids was part of the repertory of Attic vase-painters and inspired sculpture groups and wall frescoes as well as relief carvings on Roman sarcophagi.

9. In Greek mythology, the Niobids were the children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe, slain by Apollo and Artemis because Niobe, born of the royal house of Phrygia, had boastfully compared the greater number of her own offspring with those of Leto, Apollo's and Artemis' mother: a classic example of hubris.

10. According to some sources, however, two of the Niobids who had supplicated Leto were spared: Apollodorus gives their names as Meliboea (Chloris) and Amyclas.

11. The Niobids were buried by the gods at Thebes.

12. In another version of the myth, the Niobids are the children of Philottus and Niobe, daughter of Assaon.

13. The Massacre of the Niobids by Andrea Camassei, Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica.

14. Alternatively, it may be the slaying of the giant Tityos, who threatened his mother Leto, or the episode of the Niobids.

15. The Niobid Painter was an ancient Athenian vase painter in the red figure style who was active from approximately 470 to 450 BC. He is named after a calyx krater which shows the god Apollo and his sister Artemis killing the children of Niobe who were collectively called the Niobids.

16. The massacre of the Niobids by Apollo and Artemis is shown on side B of the Niobid Krater.

17. The pediment included two bas-reliefs of hunting the Galatians, from Delphi, and 6th century BC Chian art, with sculptures of the Niobids by Bupalus and Athenis.

18. He painted for Taddeo Barberini, two large canvases (1638–39) depicting Massacre of the Niobids and Hunt of Diana.

19. The discovery of The Wrestlers caused such an immediate sensation among the cognoscenti of Rome, that the event can be dated to the very end of March or beginning of April 1583, in a vigna belonging to the Tommasini da Gallese family near Porta San Giovanni, Rome, together with the group of individual sculptures called the Niobids.

20. Within days of their excavation, Valerio Cioli, a sculptor and restorer of Roman antiquities in Rome, was writing to the secretary of Francesco I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, to alert his patron to the discovery, and the Medici lost no time: on 25 June the group, and the Niobids were purchased from a member of the Varese family, who had managed to gain possession of them in the intervening weeks, by the Grand Duke's brother (and eventual heir) Ferdinando Cardinal de' Medici, who took it to add to the outstanding gallery of antiquities at Villa Medici.

21. 'Mirador de Lindaraja', Ben Johnson, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 220 x 220 cm. 'Room of the Niobids', 2012, Acrylic on canvas, 180 x 252 cm. 'Reflections on Past and Present, Paris', Ben Johnson, 1996, Acrylic on canvas, 254 x 203 cm. 'Reading Between the Lines', Ben Johnson, 1997, Acrylic on canvas, 152 x 229 cm. Local school children view Ben Johnson's painting 'Patio de Los Arrayanes' at retrospective at Southampton City Art Gallery.

22. The front of this sarcophagus only shows ten Niobids, but two more are depicted on either side of it. There are also two bearded Pedagogues shown trying to save the Niobids on the front and a nurse on the left trying to do the same on the front, along with Niobe herself on the left trying to protect one of her daughters.

23. The person who picked out this sarcophagus for their loved one likely saw themselves as Niobe and their loved one as the Niobids, left behind after a tragedy to mourn alone.

24. It has been suggested that the climbing stance of the faun was taken from one of the Niobids.

25. In Greek mythology, Philomache or Phylomache (Ancient Greek: Φυλομάχην) was a Theban princess and one of the Niobids.

26. Archenor or Acheinor (Ancient Greek: Ἀρχεήνωρ) was in Greek mythology one of the Niobids, and perhaps the same who is called by Ovid "Alphenor".

27. The names of the Niobids, however, differ very much in the different lists.

28. In Greek mythology, the name Chloris (/ˈklɔːrɪs/; Greek Χλωρίς Khlōris, from χλωρός khlōros, meaning "greenish-yellow", "pale green", "pale", "pallid" or "fresh") was the daughter of a different Amphion (himself son of Iasus, king of Orchomenus) by "Persephone, daughter of Minyas" [sic]. She was often confused with another Chloris, one of the Niobids, children of another Amphion by Niobe.

29. In Greek mythology, the name Chloris (/ˈklɔːrɪs/; Greek Χλωρίς Khlōris, from χλωρός khlōros, meaning "greenish-yellow", "pale green", "pale", "pallid", or "fresh") also called Meliboea, was one of Niobe and Amphion's fourteen children (the Niobids).

30. Meliboea was the only one (or one of two) spared when Artemis and Apollo killed the Niobids in retribution for Niobe's insult to their mother Leto, bragging that she had many children and Leto had only two.