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kourotrophos in a sentence

1. As the protector of young (kourotrophos), Apollo is concerned with the health and education of children.

2. Apollo Kourotrophos is the god who nurtures and protects children and the young, especially boys.

3. As Kourotrophos, she was the nurse of youths.

4. In Ancient Greece there were several cults worshipping the "Kourotrophos", the suckling mother, represented by goddesses such as Gaia, Hera and Artemis.

5. Though Etruscans preferred to show the goddess as a nurturer (Kourotrophos) rather than an abductor of young men, the late Archaic sculptural acroterion from Etruscan Cære, now in Berlin, showing the goddess in archaic running pose adapted from the Greeks, and bearing a boy in her arms, has commonly been identified as Eos and Cephalus.

6. According to John Tzetzes the kourotrophos, or nurse of Poseidon was Arne, who denied knowing where he was, when Cronus came searching;

7. Thetis is not successful in her role protecting and nurturing a hero (the theme of kourotrophos), but her role in succoring deities is emphatically repeated by Homer, in three Iliad episodes: as well as her rescue of Zeus (1.396ff) and Hephaestus (18.369), Diomedes recalls that when Dionysus was expelled by Lycurgus with the Olympians' aid, he took refuge in the Erythraean Sea with Thetis in a bed of seaweed (6.123ff).

8. Among the Greeks, T. H. Price notes the nurturing power of Kourotrophos might be invoked in sacrifices and recorded in inscription, without specifically identifying Hera or Demeter.

9. In Ancient Greece there were several cults worshiping the "Kourotrophos", the suckling mother, represented by goddesses such as Gaia, Hera and Artemis.

10. She coined the term kourotrophos for a particular class of these artifacts depicting a woman holding a child.

11. In the solemn moment when Medea picks the dire underworld root for Jason, she calls seven times upon Brimo, "she who haunts the night, the Nursing Mother [Kourotrophos]. In black weed And murky gloom she dwells, Queen of the Dead".

12. Other Macedonian appellations to the god were Agrios (Ἄγριος) "wild" (as god of the countryside) and Erikryptos (Ἐρίκρυπτος) "completely hidden" (as the god hidden from the frenzied women roaming the countryside - see the Proitides and the Minyades - by the kourotrophos Kala Thea, the Beautiful Goddess, and raised as a girl: the transition to pseudanor).

13. Kourotrophos (Greek: κουροτρόφος, "child nurturer") is the name that was given in ancient Greece to gods and goddesses whose properties included their ability to protect young people.

14. Kourotrophos was a deity of the city of Athens, who was not among the major Olympian deities.

15. Kourotrophos was a major figure of cult, appearing in sacrifice groups connected with fertility and child care.

16. Kourotrophos is similar to the Dea Gravida, which are figures representing either a goddesses or woman who is visibly pregnant.

17. The term kourotrophos (plural kourotrophoi) or the verb kourotrophic is used to describe female figurines depicted with infants, which may depict either mortal women or divinities.

18. Cyprus was notable for its production of plank figure Kourotrophos during the Early Cypriot III to the Middle Cypriot I periods (approximately 2000-1800 B.C.E.).

19. Dea Gravida is similar to kourotrophos figures.

20. Kourotrophos was also used to describe ancient Greek gods and goddesses whose properties included their ability to protect young people.

21. Kourotrophos was a major figure of cult, appearing in sacrifice groups connected with fertility and child care.