Home > Letter H > hacktivists

No. sentence
1 Hacktivists' assaults on state targets have prompted governments to try rounding them up.
2 There is certainly evidence that some online intrusions are the result of a very different approach to the random assaults mounted by hacktivists.
3 The hacktivists may do most damage by providing cover for more sinister efforts.
4 The recent wave of 'hacktivists' presents new issues for web developers, as many traditional organisations are now having their sites hacked.
5 failure of Anonymous to take down Amazon (by either lack of support or strength of server) shows that the future of DDoS attacks lies only with the "hacktivists" themselves.
6 These institutions are considered prestigious in global governance, and the attack is a milestone achievement for the hacktivists.
7 While hacktivists are gathering speed, another source of hacking—organised-crime groups—are going about their business as usual.
8 Using a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack, hacktivists make websites inaccessible using botnets, and overwhelming the target site with server requests.
9 difficult areas lie in the middle, especially around the "hacktivists" who are the main actors on both sides.
10 The way these hacktivists work to develop and distribute resembles the anarchist ideals, especially when it comes to preserving users' privacy from state surveillance.
11 Some terms used in fanspeak have spread to members of the Society for Creative Anachronism ("Scadians"), Renaissance Fair participants ("Rennies"), hacktivists, and internet gaming and chat fans, due to the social and contextual intersection between the communities.
12 nom de guerre have included convicted ELF arsonists, as well as hacktivists who successfully attacked the websites of DARE, Republican National Committee and sites related to U.S. President George W. Bush's 2004 re-election campaign.
13 In order to carry out their operations, hacktivists might create new tools;
14 Some people describing themselves as hacktivists have taken to defacing websites for political reasons, such as attacking and defacing government websites as well as web sites of groups who oppose their ideology.
15 While some self-described hacktivists have engaged in DoS attacks, critics suggest that DoS attacks are an attack on free speech and that they have unintended consequences.
16 On the other hand, Jay Leiderman, an attorney for many hacktivists, argues that DDoS can be a legitimate form of protest speech in situations that are reasonably limited in time, place and manner.
17 nom de guerre have included convicted ELF arsonists, as well as hacktivists who successfully attacked the websites of DARE, Republican National Committee and sites related to U.S. President George W. Bush's 2004 re-election campaign.
18 The term electronic civil disobedience and hacktivism may be used synonymously, although some commentators maintain that the difference is that ECD actors don’t hide their names, while most hacktivists wish to remain anonymous.
19 Some commentators maintain that ECD uses only legal means, as opposed to illegal actions used by hacktivists.
20 On February 24, 2011, hacktivists successfully took Westboro Baptist Church's websites down.
21 After Westboro announced plans to picket funerals of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting on December 14, 2012, hacktivists from Anonymous executed a distributed denial of service attack (DDOS) on the Westboro's website, GodHatesFags.com, stating: "We will continuously DDOS until they are forced to put their inbred church tithes to use to pay for bandwidth."
22 Jesselyn Radack (born December 12, 1970) is an American national security and human rights attorney known for her defense of whistleblowers, journalists, and hacktivists.