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1 The first cathode-ray tube to use a hot cathode was developed by John Bertrand Johnson (who gave his name to the term Johnson noise) and Harry Weiner Weinhart of Western Electric, and became a commercial product in 1922.
2 Cathodes are induced to emit electrons by several mechanisms: Cathodes can be divided into two types: A hot cathode is a cathode that is heated by a filament to produce electrons by thermionic emission.
3 The first cathode ray tube to use a hot cathode was developed by John B. Johnson (who gave his name to the term Johnson noise) and Harry Weiner Weinhart of Western Electric, and became a commercial product in 1922.
4 The type known as a thermionic tube or thermionic valve uses the phenomenon of thermionic emission of electrons from a hot cathode and is used for a number of fundamental electronic functions such as signal amplification and current rectification.
5 This used a hot cathode that caused an electric current to flow in a vacuum.
6 X-rays can be generated by an X-ray tube, a vacuum tube that uses a high voltage to accelerate the electrons released by a hot cathode to a high velocity.
7 The other type of cathode is a hot cathode, which is heated by electric current passing through a filament.
8 A cold cathode is distinguished from a hot cathode that is heated to induce thermionic emission of electrons.
9 The classical example of thermionic emission is that of electrons from a hot cathode into a vacuum (also known as thermal electron emission or the Edison effect) in a vacuum tube.
10 A thyratron consists of a hot cathode, an anode, and one or more control grids between the anode and cathode in an airtight glass or ceramic envelope that is filled with gas.
11 The device consists of a hot cathode (filaments), grids and anodes (phosphor) encased in a glass envelope under a high vacuum condition.
12 A direct current, electrostatic thermionic electron gun is formed from several parts: a hot cathode, which is heated to create a stream of electrons via thermionic emission, electrodes generating an electric field to focus the electron beam (such as a Wehnelt cylinder), and one or more anode electrodes which accelerate and further focus the beam.