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The Alaska Native Language Center in a sentence

1. The Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks claims that at least 20 Alaskan native languages exist and there are also some languages with different dialects.

2. The Alaska Native Language Center believes that the common ancestral language of the Eskimo languages and of Aleut divided into the Eskimo and Aleut branches at least 4,000 years ago.

3. Since 2000 Irene Solomon has worked as a language specialist at the Alaska Native Language Center and has collaborated on a number of projects with linguist Gary Holton, including a phrase book, a learners' dictionary, and a multimedia description of the sound system.

4. The Alaska Native Language Center, for example, takes the position that recent improved data on Haida have served to conclusively disprove the Haida-inclusion hypothesis.

5. Beginning at age 12, he had taught himself Eyak, utilizing print and audio instructional materials he obtained from the Alaska Native Language Center.

6. Near the end of his life, he worked with linguist James Kari of the Alaska Native Language Center and anthropologist Alan Boraas of Kenai Peninsula College to compile his collected works.

7. There are several book publishers at UAF, including the University of Alaska Press, the Alaska Native Language Center, Alaska Sea Grant, the University of Alaska Museum of the North, UAF Cooperative Extension Service, and the Alaska Native Knowledge Network.

8. Approximately 300 Alaskan Gwichʼin speak their language, according to the Alaska Native Language Center.

9. Michael E. Krauss (August 15, 1934 – August 11, 2019) was an American linguist, professor emeritus, founder and long-time head of the Alaska Native Language Center.

10. Krauss joined the faculty of the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1960 and served as director of the Alaska Native Language Center from its inception in 1972 until his retirement in June 2000.

11. Engithidong Xugixudhoy (Their Stories of Long Ago), a collection of traditional folk tales in Deg Xinag by the elder Belle Deacon, was published in 1987 by the Alaska Native Language Center.

12. The Alaska Native Language Center, established in 1972 in Fairbanks, Alaska, is a research center focusing on the research and documentation of the Native languages of Alaska.

13. In the summer of 2011, the Alaska Native Language Center made an update to Krauss's map.

14. It was edited by James Kari and published in 2000 by the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

15. With James Kari of the Alaska Native Language Center, Boraas coedited the book Dena'ina Legacy — K'tl'egh'i Sukdu: The Collected Writings of Peter Kalifornsky by Peter Kalifornsky.

16. James Kari, a linguist at the Alaska Native Language Center at University of Alaska Fairbanks, had been working with Kalifornsky since 1972 on the Dena'ina language.

17. She died on September 25, 2017 at the age of 90. Dauenhauer researched Tlingit language for the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks from 1972 to 1973.

18. In the 1960s, Irene Reed and others at the Alaska Native Language Center developed a modern writing system for the language.

19. James Kari is a linguist and Professor Emeritus with the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) specializing in the Dene (a.k.a. Athabascan languages) of Alaska.

20. On March 24, 2012, the Alaska Native Language Center hosted the Dené-Yeniseian Workshop at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

21. The Center collaborated closely with the Alaska Native Language Center in Fairbanks.

22. With the closing of the Center the rights to publication were passed to the Alaska Native Language Center, which still distributes and reprints many NBMDC publications.

23. This fact was documented by Dr. Michael E. Krauss of the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska and is illustrated on the map.

24. About 20 native languages are being worked with by the Alaska Native Language Center (ANLC).

25. The Archive was created as part of the Alaska Native Language Center by state legislation in 1972.

26. In 2009 the Archive was administratively separated and now exists as a sister organization to the Alaska Native Language Center, collaborating on numerous language efforts in Alaska.

27. Copies of both the Rossi and Jette manuscripts are available at the Alaska Native Language Center archive.

28. Tuttle started working an Associate Professor of Linguistics at the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2003.

29. The Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks claims that at least 20 Alaskan native languages exist and there are also some languages with different dialects.

30. The Alaska Native Language Center indicates that the common ancestral language of the Eskimo languages and of Aleut divided into the Eskimo and Aleut branches at least 4,000 years ago.