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Rheobatrachus in a sentence

1. The female gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus spp.) reared larvae in her stomach after swallowing either the eggs or hatchlings;

2. The female gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus sp.) from Australia, now probably extinct, swallows her fertilized eggs, which then develop inside her stomach.

3. the southern gastric brooding frog Rheobatrachus silus which only became known to science in 1973 and the southern dayfrog Taudactylus diurnus declined rapidly between 1979 and 1981 with both presumed extinct.

4. Epidemics of the chytrid fungus have also occurred in Eungella National Park in North Queensland around 1985-1986 causing the decline of the Eungella gastric brooding frog Rheobatrachus vitellinus.

5. and three frogs, Taudactylus liemi (Eungella tinker frog), Taudactylus eungellensis (Eungella torrent frog or Eungella dayfrog) and Rheobatrachus vitellinus (northern gastric-brooding frog).

6. The northern gastric brooding frog (Rheobatrachus vitellinus) was discovered in January 1984, but has not been seen since March 1985 and is believed to be extinct.

7. The gastric-brooding frogs or platypus frogs (Rheobatrachus) is a genus of extinct ground-dwelling frogs native to Queensland in eastern Australia.

8. The genus Rheobatrachus was first described in 1973 by David Liem and since has not undergone any scientific classification changes;

9. In 2006, D. R. Frost and colleagues found Rheobatrachus, on the basis of molecular evidence, to be the sister taxon of Mixophyes and placed it within Myobatrachidae.

10. The southern gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus silus) was discovered in 1972 and described in 1973, though there is one publication suggesting that the species was discovered in 1914 (from the Blackall Range).

11. Rheobatrachus silus was restricted to the Blackall Range and Conondale Ranges in southeast Queensland, north of Brisbane, between elevations of 350 and 800 metres (1,150 and 2,620 ft) above sea level.

12. The northern gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus vitellinus) was discovered in 1984 by Michael Mahony.

13. With Rheobatrachus (and several other species) there is no opening to the gut and the mucus cords are excreted.

14. The two species of gastric-brooding frog (genus: Rheobatrachus), are found in this family.

15. Some animals have a common name that includes the word 'brood' or its derivatives, although it is arguable whether the animals show 'broodiness' per se. For example, the female gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus sp.) from Australia, now probably extinct, swallows her fertilized eggs, which then develop inside her stomach.

16. He has been prominent in research into the world-wide phenomenon of the disappearance of frogs, even entire species, notably in Australia the two species of gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus vitellinus and Rheobatrachus silus), which were declared extinct shortly after their discovery).