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Proto-Arabic in a sentence

1. A de facto group of distinct language varieties within the Semitic branch, the languages that evolved from Proto-Arabic have around 313 million native speakers, concentrated primarily in West Asia and North Africa.

2. These features are evidence of common descent from a hypothetical ancestor, Proto-Arabic.

3. The following features can be reconstructed with confidence for Proto-Arabic: Arabia boasted a wide variety of Semitic languages in antiquity.

4. Proto-Arabic, or Ancient North Arabian, texts give a clearer picture of the Arabs' emergence.

5. From about the 2nd century BCE, a few inscriptions from Qaryat al-Faw reveal a dialect no longer considered proto-Arabic, but pre-classical Arabic.

6. The consonant /p/ may have been generally transformed into /f/ in Punic and in late Phoenician, as it was in Proto-Arabic.

7. Classical Arabic however, shows a far more archaic system, essentially identical with that of Proto-Arabic: The definite article spread areally among the Central Semitic languages and it would seem that Proto-Arabic lacked any overt marking of definiteness.

8. Note the inclusion of palatal /ɕ/, which alone among the palatal consonants exhibits assimilation, indicating that assimilation ceased to be productive before that consonant shifted from Old Arabic /ɬ/: Proto-Central Semitic, Proto-Arabic, various forms of Old Arabic, and some modern Najdi dialects to this day have alternation in the performative vowel of the prefix conjugation, depending on the stem vowel of the verb.

9. His name may be derived from the proto-Arabic basam, or balsam, a plant that was used in ancient medicines, indicating that he may have been a deity associated with healing or health.

10. Safaitic inscriptions, proto-Arabic texts written by literate Bedouin, are found throughout the Syrian Desert.

11. and ʿUrbi . The presence of Proto-Arabic names amongst those qualified by the terms arguably justifies the translation "Arab" although it is not certain if they all in fact represent the same group.

12. The North Arabian branch of the Semitic language family, consists of languages and dialects spoken in pre-Islamic North and Central Arabia and South Syria, the majority of which were the descendants of Proto-Arabic and their descendants, including:

13. As a hypothetical language or group of languages, Ancient North Arabian forms one branch of the North Arabian group, the other being Proto-Arabic.

14. The Northwest Arabian Arabic dialects display several innovations from Proto-Arabic: There are several differences between the western and eastern branches of Northwest Arabian Arabic: The following are some archaic features retained from Proto-Arabic:

15. His updated analysis of 100-word standard Swadesh list applied to over 30 Semitic languages mainly corroborated his previous unorthodox genealogical classification according to which Proto-Semitic split between 4,800-4,700 B.C.E. into South Semitic (represented by Modern South Arabian) and North Semitic falling about a thousand years later into Akkadian and West Semitic branching in early 3rd millennium B.C.E. into Proto-Ethiopian (dividing on the verge of 2nd and 1st millennia B.C.E. into North and South Ethiopian), Proto-Arabic, and Proto-Levantine falling between 2,400 and 2,300 B.C.E. into Ugaritic and South Levantine branching on the verge of 3rd and 2nd millennia B.C.E. into Aramaic, Epigraphic South Arabian (represented in the analysis by Sabaic) and Canaanite represented by Hebrew and Phoenician separated between 15th and 14th centuries B.C.E. Militarev conjectures that the dates obtained may be compatible with both the known historical events, archaeological dating and even internal biblical chronology.

16. Dadanitic exhibits a few forms which seem to have been lost at the Proto-Arabic stage: There are several inscriptions that seem to contain forms that point to the merging of ẓ and ṭ in Dadanitic.

17. Proto-Arabic is the name given to the hypothetical reconstructed ancestor of all the varieties of Arabic attested since the 9th century BC. There are two lines of evidence to reconstruct Proto-Arabic: Old Arabic in the Nabataean script is first attested in the Negev desert in the 1st century BC, but it becomes more frequent in the region after the decline of Safaitic and Hismaic.

18. The urheimat of Proto-Arabic can thus be regarded as the frontier between northwest Arabia and the southern Levant.

19. They are evidence of common descent from a hypothetical ancestor, Proto-Arabic.

20. The following features can be reconstructed with confidence for Proto-Arabic:

21. Taymanitic does not participate in the key innovations of Proto-Arabic, precluding it from being considered a member of the Arabic language family.

22. In Greek transcription, this sound was felt to be closer to an e-class vowel, yielding Δουσαρης. Proto-Arabic nouns could take one of the five above declensions in their basic, unbound form.

23. The definite article spread areally among the Central Semitic languages and it would seem that Proto-Arabic lacked any overt marking of definiteness.

24. Here is an example of reconstructed Old Hejazi side-by-side with its classicized form, with remarks on phonology: Notes: Proto-Arabic nouns could take one of the five above declensions in their basic, unbound form.

25. The definite article spread areally among the Central Semitic languages and it would seem that Proto-Arabic lacked any overt marking of definiteness.

26. Among the most prominent civilizations was Dilmun, which arose around the 4th millennium BC and lasted to 538 BC, and Thamud, which arose around the 1st millennium BC and lasted to about 300 CE. Additionally, from the beginning of the first millennium BC, Southern Arabia was the home to a number of kingdoms, such as the Sabaean kingdom, and the coastal areas of Eastern Arabia were controlled by the Parthian and Sassanians from 300 BC. Proto-Arabic, or Ancient North Arabian, texts give a clearer picture of the Arabs' emergence.

27. From about the 2nd century BCE, a few inscriptions from Qaryat al-Faw reveal a dialect no longer considered proto-Arabic, but pre-classical Arabic.