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No. sentence
1 In the Sasanian Empire, Mazdak called for an egalitarian society and the abolition of monarchy, only to be soon executed by Emperor Kavad I. In Basra, religious sects preached against the state.
2 Mazdak the Younger (died c. 524 or 528 CE), a Persian communal proto-socialist, instituted communal possessions and advocated the public good.
3 In c. 520, Kavad, in order to secure the succession of Khosrow, whose position was threatened by rival brothers and the Mazdakite sect, proposed that Emperor Justin I adopt him.
4 Siyawush was thus most likely a Mazdakite, the religious sect that Kavad originally supported but now had withdrawn his support from.
5 Mazdak was the name of a chief representative of a religious and philosophical teaching called Mazdakism, which opposed violence, and called for the sharing of wealth, women and property, an archaic form of communism.
6 Mazdakism not only consisted of theological and cosmological aspects, but also political and social impacts, which was to the disadvantage of the nobility and clergy.
7 According to modern historians Touraj Daryaee and Matthew Canepa, sharing women was most likely an overstatement and defamation deriving from Mazdak's decree that loosened marriage rules to help the lower classes.
8 With the reforms roaring by the 520s, he no longer had use of Mazdak.
9 As a result, he officially withdrew his support from the Mazdakites.
10 A debate was arranged, where not only the Zoroastrian priesthood, but also the Christian and Jewish ones slandered Mazdak and his followers.
11 According to the Shahnameh ("The Book of Kings"), written several centuries later by the medieval Persian poet Ferdowsi, Kavad had Mazdak and his supporters sent to Khosrow, who had his supporters killed by burying their heads in a walled orchard, with only their feet being visible.
12 Khosrow then summoned Mazdak to look at his garden, saying the following;
13 Mazdak, seeing his followers corpses, screamed and passed out.
14 Unlike Khosrow, he was a Mazdakite (or at least had strong Mazdakite sympathies), and thus had their support as the candidate for the throne.
15 With the outbreak of the Mazdakite revolution, there was a great uprising of peasants and lower-class citizens who grabbed large portions of land under egalitarian values.
16 This was due to the royal anxieties regarding the chance of religious rogues to upset the political structure, which had recently occurred during Kavad and Khosrow's reigns by the Mazdakites.
17 Inheriting a declining empire where the authority and status of the Sasanian kings had largely ended, Kavad tried to reorganize his empire by introducing many reforms whose implementation was completed by his son and successor Khosrow I. They were made possible by Kavad's use of the Mazdakite preacher Mazdak leading to a social revolution that weakened the authority of the nobility and the clergy.
18 Not long after Sukhra's execution, a Zoroastrian priest named Mazdak caught Kavad's attention.
19 Mazdak was the chief representative of a religious and philosophical movement called Mazdakism.
20 The Mazdak movement was against violence and called for the sharing of wealth, women and property, an archaic form of communism.
21 According to modern historians Touraj Daryaee and Matthew Canepa, sharing women was most likely an overstatement and defamation deriving from Mazdak's decree that loosened marriage rules to help the lower classes.
22 The historicity of the persona of Mazdak has been questioned.
23 Contemporary historians, including Procopius and Joshua the Stylite make no mention of Mazdak naming Kavad as the figure behind the movement.
24 Mention of Mazdak only emerges in later Middle Persian Zoroastrian documents, namely the Bundahishn, the Denkard, and the Zand-i Wahman yasn.
25 Later Islamic-era sources, particularly al-Tabari's work, also mention Mazdak.
26 These later writings were perhaps corrupted by Iranian oral folklore, given that blame put on Mazdak for the redistribution of aristocratic properties to the people, is a topic repeated in Iranian oral history.
27 Kavad's reign is noteworthy for his reforms, which he had been able to make with the nobility and clergy weakened by the Mazdakites.
28 With his reforms under way by the 520s, Kavad no longer had any use for Mazdak, and he officially stopped supporting the Mazdakites.
29 A debate was arranged where not only the Zoroastrian priesthood, but also Christian and Jewish leaders slandered Mazdak and his followers.
30 According to the Shahnameh (The Book of Kings), written several centuries later by the medieval Persian poet Ferdowsi, Kavad had Mazdak and his supporters sent to Khosrow.