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Ensatina in a sentence

1. The amphibious salamander Ensatina attaches its similar clusters by stalks to underwater stems and roots.

2. The ensatina salamander occasionally makes a hissing sound, while the sirens sometimes produce quiet clicks, and can resort to faint shrieks if attacked.

3. The embryos of some terrestrial lungless salamanders, such as Ensatina, that undergo direct development, have large gills that lie close to the egg's surface.

4. In California, the palatable yellow-eyed salamander (Ensatina eschscholtzii) closely resembles the toxic California newt (Taricha torosa) and the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa), whereas in other parts of its range, it is cryptically colored.

5. Some amphibians found in Thousand Oaks include ensatina, slender salamander, western toad, American bullfrog, California toad, Pacific tree frog, and the California red-legged frog.

6. There are quite a few salamanders throughout the region, including: the Arizona tiger salamander (Ambystoma mavortium nebulosum) and the painted ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii picta).

7. The female salamander Ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii) curls around the clutch of eggs and massages individual eggs with her pulsating throat.

8. Yellow-Eyed Ensatina (Ensatina eschscholztii xanthoptica), California Slender Salamanders (Batrachoseps attenuatus), and Arboreal Salamanders (Aneides lugubris) can be found in the wooded areas of the park.

9. Also in the 1940s, Robert C. Stebbins described the Ensatina salamanders around the Californian Central Valley as a ring species;

10. Some of the examples such as the Larus gull complex, the greenish warbler of Asia, and the Ensatina salamanders of America, have been disputed.

11. Amphibians include the Blackbelly salamander, Ensatina, Western skink, and numerous toad- and frog species: California toad, American bullfrog, California treefrog and Pacific treefrog.

12. The genus Ensatina originated approximately 21.5 million years ago.

13. It is usually considered as monospecific, being represented by a single species, Ensatina eschscholtzii, with several subspecies forming a ring species.

14. The Ensatina subspecies E. e. eschscholtzii, or Monterey ensatina, can be found in Santa Cruz, Monterey, and the California coastal mountains.

15. Ensatina eschscholtzii has been described as a ring species in the mountains surrounding the Californian Central Valley.

16. Richard Highton argued that Ensatina is a case of multiple species and not a continuum of one species (meaning, by traditional definitions, it is not a ring species).

17. The ensatina can usually be found under logs or brush, by or in streams and lakes, and in other moist places.

18. There are quite a few salamanders throughout the region, including: the Arizona tiger salamander (Ambystoma mavortium nebulosum) and the painted ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii picta).

19. Amphibians include, but are not limited to, rough-skinned newts, northwestern salamanders, western red-backed salamander, Coastal tailed frog, Coastal giant salamander, red-legged frog, southern torrent salamander, and Ensatina.

20. This salamander generally prefers moister microhabitats than sympatric species such as Ensatina or the Western Red-backed Salamander.

21. The Oregon ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii oregonensis) (commonly known by its genus name, Ensatina) is a complex of plethodontid (lungless) salamanders.

22. Ensatina. Black salamander.

23. Ensatina eschscholtzii (commonly known by its genus name, Ensatina) is a complex of plethodontid (lungless) salamanders.

24. Wildlife species that may occur in this community include ensatina, Pacific slender salamander, Pacific giant salamander, western-screech owl, Allen's hummingbird, purple martin, acorn woodpecker, Steller's jay, Townsend's western big-eared bat, and pallid bat.

25. Ensatina. Tailed Frog. Western Toad. Pacific Tree Frog.

26. His discovery of the ring species phenomenon in Ensatina salamanders is now a textbook example of speciation, and he performed extensive research on the parietal eye of reptiles.

27. Stebbins soon became interested in Ensatina salamanders, which occur from British Columbia to Baja California and are present in both the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges of California but absent in the Central Valley.

28. The Ensatina complex has been the focus of research ever since, and is a widely used textbook example of evolutionary processes.

29. Other research included field work in Colombia, South Africa, and Australia, and the description of several species: the Jemez Mountains salamander, southern torrent salamander, yellow-eyed ensatina, and the panamint alligator lizard.

30. The most common amphibians here are found along the Arroyo Conejo creekbed, and include the ensatina, slender salamander, western toad, American bullfrog, California toad, Pacific tree frog, and the California red-legged frog.