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Dizoid in a sentence

1. It therefore splits off the following groups as small families: South Omotic, Mao, Dizoid, Gonga–Gimojan (North Omotic apart from the preceding), Ongota, Kujarge.

2. Four separate "Omotic" groups are accepted by Glottolog 4.0 and Güldemann (2018): Ta-Ne-Omotic, Dizoid (Maji), Mao, and Aroid ("South Omotic").

3. Dizoid is left out in later classifications, but included in earlier ones.

4. Sheko, together with the Dizi and Nayi languages, is part of a cluster of languages variously called "Maji" or "Dizoid".

5. Hellenthal (2010, p.45) lists the following consonant phonemes of Sheko: Unlike other Dizoid languages, Sheko has no contrast between /r/ and /l/. Consonants are rarely geminated, and there is a syllabic nasal /n̩/ Hellenthal (2010, p. 56) lists the following long and short vowels of Sheko: /i/, /ii/, /e/, /ee/ /ə/, /a/, /aa/, /u/, /uu/, /o/, /oo/. Sheko is one of very few languages in Africa that have four distinct phonemic tone levels.

6. (Beachy 2005:iv) Dizin, together with the Sheko and Nayi languages, is part of a cluster of languages variously called "Maji" or "Dizoid".

7. Nayi, together with the Dizi and Sheko languages, is part of a cluster of languages variously called "Maji" or "Dizoid".

8. The Dizoid or Maji (Majoid) languages consist of three languages spoken in southwestern Ethiopia: Dizi differs from the rest of the two languages somewhat more (Aklilu 2003), although Glottolog considers similarities between Sheko and Nayi to be due to retentions rather than evidence of subgrouping.

9. Güldemann (2018) accepts that Dizoid is more likely to be related to Ta-Ne ("North Omotic") than Mao and Aroid are, and observes loanword influence on Maji languages from the Gimira subgroup of Ta-Ne. Comparison of numerals in individual languages: